Put Your Tennis Racquet Aside, and Let’s Discuss Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is inflammation, soreness, or pain on the outside (lateral) side of the upper arm near the elbow. With tennis elbow, there may be a partial tear of the tendon fibers, which Tennis Elbow Epidemic: Are you using the right tennis racquet?connect muscle to bone, or the tear may be at or near where these fibers begin, on the outside of the elbow. According to our tennis elbow research, an estimated 70% of kids in tennis training programs suffer serious injury and surgery before the age of 13. Now, that’s a pretty steep number! So we suggest putting your tennis racquet aside for just a moment so we can discuss the tennis elbow epidemic, by the numbers:

  • 4 – Most commonly believed causes of tennis elbow: (1) overuse, (2) technique, (3) racquet, (4) direct hit to the side of the elbow or falling on an outstretched arm.
  • 0 – Number of conclusive studies on the cause of tennis elbow.
  • 1 – Reason there are no tennis elbow studies: no medical or tennis organization has been willing or able to provide necessary funding.
  • 3 – Symptoms that signal that you have tennis elbow: When pain (1) slowly increases around the outside of the elbow, (2) is worse when shaking hands or squeezing objects, (3) is made worse when moving the wrist (e.g. using tools, opening jars, or even using a knife and fork).
  • 50 – Percent of the tennis-playing public will get tennis elbow at some time in their playing lifetimes.
  • 30-50 – Age range you’re most likely to get tennis elbow.
  • 3 – Do-it-yourself tennis elbow treatments to try: (1) Rest and avoid tennis, (2) apply ice, (3) take ibuprofen.  See a doctor if these self-care steps don’t ease the pain and tenderness.
  • 5 – Medical treatments for tennis elbow: (1) physical therapy, (2) forearm bracing, (3) topical anti-inflammatory and cortisone gels, (4) cortisone injections, (5) surgery. 
  • 5 – Percentage of tennis elbow sufferers who will need surgery.
  • 85-90 – Percent of those who undergo surgery actually return to the court at full strength.
  • 1 – Stroke that causes symptoms: the backhand.
  • 4 – Things you should do when you return to the court: (1) Use the proper tennis racquet, (2) Wear a counter-force brace around the forearm just below the elbow, (3) relax your grip on the handle, (4) pay attention to movements that can cause pain.

Were you able to keep count? Tennis safety is a top priority for Donnay and the focus of our Safety Blog, so be sure to lean on us for tennis health information anytime at http://blog.donnayusa.com/!

 (Sources: 1. International Tennis Federation, 2. MayoClinic.com,
3. U.S. National Library of Medicine, 4. EmedicineHealth.com)

 

Health & Safety in Tennis Come First!

There is one common goal all athletes share and that’s to win. Regardless of what sport an athlete is passionate about, the long hours of practice, the blood, the sweat, and the tears, are all worth the glory that comes from a buzzer ending victory! Every tennis pro knows that feeling all too well – having one of your best sets and finishing out a match as victorious. It is a feeling that sometimes cannot be put into words…

However, there comes a point when victory and pain do not match up. The type of pain athletes ignore until it is too late; when injury rears its ugly head, even the most competitive athletes cringe at the thought of a doctor’s visit. Especially a visit that leads to sitting on the sidelines, watching coaches and teammates go about their daily routine.

Health and safety in tennis is just as important as winning and keeping your competitive edge alive! To stay on the court, a tennis player needs to remain in tip-top shape and stay as healthy as possible!

We, here at Donnay, are not the only ones that believe in putting tennis safety and health in front of all else. Tune in as Johan Kreik expresses the message, ‘Health Comes First,’:

 When you’re the mother of a blooming tennis pro, you know the importance of arm safe performance and instill this in your growing athlete. Yet, Johan Kreik isn’t the only tennis pro that learned the message of ‘Health Comes First,’ during  his career. Check out the below video as Vince Spadea explains where he learned the importance of arm safety and tennis health:

How do you stay healthy through your grueling practices and matches? Connect with us on Facebook and Twitter to share your methods of staying in-shape all season long. Don’t forget, you can also drop us a line right here on our Safety Blog! We look forward to hearing from you.